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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
The latest news and headlines from Yahoo! News. Get breaking news stories and in-depth coverage with videos and photos.

  • 'Good Samaritan' Trying to Help Lost Toddler Attacked by Child's Father: Cops

    'Good Samaritan' Trying to Help Lost Toddler Attacked by Child's Father: CopsA Florida man was trying to find the parents of a lost toddler when the child's dad punched him repeatedly, authorities said.




  • China's verdant 'forest city' will fight pollution with a million plants

    China's verdant 'forest city' will fight pollution with a million plantsIf tree-covered skyscrapers act like enormous air filters, this cluster of buildings will be a clean air oasis. China has broken ground on a "forest city" in the southern city of Liuzhou. The development, which will span two-thirds of a mile along the Liujiang River, involves blanketing offices, apartments, hotels, and schools with more than a million plants and about 40,000 trees. SEE ALSO: How drones are helping to plant trees The verdant towers will help soak up urban air pollution, produce clean oxygen, and boost local biodiversity. The greenery also provides shade on sunny days and acts as an insulating blanket during winter, allowing tenants to use less heating and electricity. Liuzhou Forest City will span 175 hectares, or 0.67 miles, along the Liujiang River.Image: stefano boeri architettiIf the concept sounds familiar, that's because these buildings are the work of Stefano Boeri Architetti, the same architecture firm behind the two "vertical forest" buildings planned for Nanjing in eastern China.  Liuzhou city officials commissioned the Italian company to build the development, which will host about 30,000 people and be connected to the main Liuzhou city — population 3.8 million — via a fast-rail line used by electric cars. The forest city, now under construction, is expected to be completed by 2020, the Milan-based architects confirmed by email. 'Vertical forest' buildings in the Liuzhou development.Image: stefano boeri architettiThe development is a flashy but tiny effort to combat the dangerous smog and toxic air pollution that's choking China's industrialized cities. It comes as China is building more wind and solar power than any country in the world to slash emissions from coal plants, factories, and vehicles, and to combat climate change. Stefano Boeri's firm, which recently completed two verdant towers in Milan, is planning to expand into other smoggy cities, including China's Shijiazhuang, Guizhou, Shanghai, and Chongqing. In the Liuzhou Forest City, buildings, parks, and gardens will absorb almost 10,000 tons of carbon dioxide and 57 tons of fine dust pollutants per year, while producing about 900 tons of oxygen, the architects said in a press release.  By comparison, the two green towers in Nanjing will absorb 25 tons of carbon dioxide and produce 0.06 tons of oxygen.  An electric railway will link the 'forest city' to the main Liuzhou city.Image: stefano boeri architettiBeyond sucking up toxic air, the urban greenery is also expected to stifle noise pollution and support biodiversity by providing a habitat for the local birds, insects, and small animals that inhabit Liuzhou. The project will include residential areas, commercial and recreational spaces, plus two schools and a hospital. Along with plants, the buildings will also feature rooftop solar panels to produce clean electricity and use geothermal energy systems for interior air-conditioning. Stefano Boeri Architetti said the Liuzhou Forest City represents its broader effort to design a "new generation" of architecture and urban environments to address climate change. WATCH: China's big, beautiful, green 'vertical forests' will suck up toxic smog




  • Female teacher arrested for allegedly having sex with student in car

    Female teacher arrested for allegedly having sex with student in carA female substitute teacher has been arrested and charged with alleged sexual contact with a 17-year-old student in Missouri. Loryn Barclay, 24, has been charged with purportedly having sex with the student in his car and at his home on numerous occasions between November 2016 and January 2017. A local police officer who also serves at the school, Jay Jastal, was tipped off about the possible relationship.




  • 10 must-have iPhone accessories under $25

    10 must-have iPhone accessories under $25Apple’s iPhones are arguably the best smartphones on the planet. The hardware is fantastic, the customer service is positively unbeatable, and the iOS platform is the best mobile software platform in the world. Of course, all that comes at a price — iPhones are also some of the most expensive smartphones out there. You’ve already spent somewhere between $650 and $950 on your iPhone, so now it’s time to save some money. In this post, you’ll find 10 different must-have iPhone accessories that each cost less than $25.




  • Emmett Till Mississippi civil rights memorial vandalised for second time in two months

    Emmett Till Mississippi civil rights memorial vandalised for second time in two monthsAn sign marking the site where black teenager was accused of whistling at a white woman - something that would subsequently result in him being lynched - has been vandalised for the second time in two months. The marker on the Mississippi Freedom Trail was damaged last month when someone scratched on it. Allan Hammons, whose company manages the Mississippi Freedom Trail, more than a dozen signs established in 2011 to mark seminal moments and locations in the civil rights movements, said the incident was deeply disturbing.




  • Two U.S. studies differ over effects of marijuana on drivers

    Two U.S. studies differ over effects of marijuana on drivers(This June 22 story has been refiled to correct study author's name to "Aydelotte" instead of "Adedoyte" in third paragraph.) By Taylor Harris (Reuters) - Two U.S. studies on the effects of marijuana on drivers in states where it is allowed for recreational use came to different conclusions about whether it increases risks behind the wheel. A study by the American Journal of Public Health published on Thursday looked at motor vehicle fatalities and found no significant increase in Colorado and Washington State, where recreational marijuana use is legal, compared with eight states where it is not legal that have similar populations, vehicle ownership, and traffic laws. “Our study focused on deaths and actually found what we expected going into this," Jason Aydelotte, lead author of the study said in a telephone interview.




  • Are Whales Methodically Killing South Africa’s Great White Sharks?

    Are Whales Methodically Killing South Africa’s Great White Sharks?The great white sharks were found dead, their livers removed as if by a surgeon. Some were missing testicles and a heart.




  • London apartment tower fire triggers emergency inspections, evacuations

    London apartment tower fire triggers emergency inspections, evacuationsThe deaths of 79 people in a London apartment tower have triggered emergency inspections, evacuations and soul searching among British officials who failed to prevent the tragedy.




  • Former GOP Rep. Jolly: Affordable Care Act gave me a ‘safety net’

    Former GOP Rep. Jolly: Affordable Care Act gave me a ‘safety net’A Florida Republican who earlier campaigned against the Affordable Care Act came to a new view of it after he lost his insurance coverage.




  • Trump promotes faulty White House math on health care

    Trump promotes faulty White House math on health careIn addition to the elementary math error, the president's tweets attacked CNN, ABC, NBC, CBS, the Washington Post and the New York Times as "fake news."




  • 4 Dead, Liverless Sharks Wash Ashore in Weird Whodunit

    4 Dead, Liverless Sharks Wash Ashore in Weird WhodunitOrca whales have claimed the life of another great white shark by eating its liver and leaving it for dead, making it the fourth such gristly death in less than two months. During a four-day period in early May, researchers reported finding the bodies of three great white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) that had washed ashore along South Africa's Western Cape province. Now, a fourth dead, liverless shark has washed ashore, according to a post today (June 26) on the Marine Dynamics blog, a site hosted by a shark cage diving company.




  • Man Held Teen Girl Captive For More Than a Year: Cops

    Man Held Teen Girl Captive For More Than a Year: CopsMichael Wysolovski, 31, was arrested and charged with holding Hailey Burns captive after her parents received a tip from a woman in Romania.




  • The 10 Best National Parks in the USA

    The 10 Best National Parks in the USAExplore the great outdoors at one of America's can't-miss national parks. If you're dreaming of an outdoor vacation filled with gushing geysers, animal encounters, towering rock formations and more, odds are you'll enjoy exploring a national park. Considering factors like the uniqueness of sights, historical significance and park accessibility, we determined which of the country's 59 national parks qualify as the Best National Parks in the USA.




  • Dreaded WWII Zero fighter takes to the skies over Japan

    Dreaded WWII Zero fighter takes to the skies over JapanSalvaged from the Papua New Guinean jungle, a restored World War II Japanese Zero fighter has taken to the skies over the land that gave birth to the once-feared warplane. The aircraft -- emblazoned with tell-tale rising sun symbols -- is one of just a few airworthy Zero fighters left in the world, nearly eight decades after they struck fear into the hearts of Allied pilots. The plane flew near Tokyo this month, watched by businessman and aviation buff Masahide Ishizuka who bought the plane for 350 million yen ($3.1 million) in 2008.




  • White House warns Syria may be readying chemical attack

    White House warns Syria may be readying chemical attackThe White House warned strongman Bashar Assad that his regime would pay heavily for the slaughter of civilians.




  • Israel strikes Hamas bases in Gaza after rocket: officials

    Israel strikes Hamas bases in Gaza after rocket: officialsIsraeli airstrikes hit a series of targets in the Hamas-run Gaza Strip overnight, officials said, hours after a rocket from the Palestinian enclave landed in the Jewish state. Strikes were recorded in at least three locations in Gaza, Palestinian security sources and eyewitnesses said, with Hamas bases struck near the southern city of Rafah and Gaza City, as well as open land southeast of Gaza City. The Palestinian health ministry said there were no immediate reports of injuries, but an AFP photographer in Gaza saw at least one man bleeding being taken for treatment from a house near the base.




  • Feds looking into Bernie Sanders' wife over real estate deal

    Feds looking into Bernie Sanders' wife over real estate dealMONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Federal investigators are looking into the finances behind a real estate deal for a now-defunct college put together by the wife of U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, and she has hired a lawyer to look after her interests, a family spokesman confirmed on Monday.




  • Reports of side effects with cosmetics increasing

    Reports of side effects with cosmetics increasingBy Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Reports of adverse events associated with cosmetics and personal care products sold in the U.S. more than doubled last year, due in large part to complaints about WEN by Chaz Dean Cleansing Conditioners, a new study suggests. Researchers examined data on side effects reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from 2004 to 2016 for products like makeup, sunscreen, tattoos, hair color, perfume, shaving creams and baby care items. Overall, there were a total of 5,144 adverse events, with an average of 396 a year, researchers report in JAMA Internal Medicine.




  • Seattle employers cut hours after latest minimum wage rise, study finds

    Seattle employers cut hours after latest minimum wage rise, study findsLow-wage workers on average now clock 9 percent fewer hours and earn $125 less each month than before the Pacific Northwest city set one of the highest minimum wages in the nation, the University of Washington research paper said. Seattle, which has a booming economy and a strong technology sector, is midway through an initiative to increase its minimum wage for all employers to $15 an hour.




  • Sea level rise is accelerating, with Greenland in leading role

    Sea level rise is accelerating, with Greenland in leading roleGlobal sea level rise is accelerating as the Greenland Ice Sheet sheds more of its ice, scientists have found.  Given this quickening pace, it's possible that by the end of this century, sea level rise could threaten coastal communities around the world, from Miami to Mumbai.  A new study, published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change, is one of a few recent works to confirm an acceleration in sea level rise during the past few decades. There had been greater uncertainty about this before, with climate deniers latching onto that and arguing that such an acceleration has not, in fact, been occurring. SEE ALSO: Trump to mayor of sinking island: Don't worry about sea level rise However, by using calculations of the various contributing factors to sea level rise, such as melting ice sheets, water expansion that occurs as the oceans warm, and other factors, researchers from institutions in China, Australia, and the U.S. found that global mean sea level increased from about 2.2 millimeters per year in 1993 to 3.3 millimeters per year in 2014.  July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland.Image: Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesWhile that may seem tiny, the numbers add up quickly. These rate changes are the difference between a decadal sea level rise rate of 0.86 inches and 1.29 inches, with greater acceleration expected in the future.  The findings also made clear how major contributors to sea level rise have been changing over time. And it doesn't paint a pretty picture.  Whereas global ice mass loss constituted 50 percent of sea level rise in 1993, this rose to 70 percent in 2014. The study found that the largest increase came from the Greenland Ice Sheet, which made up just 5 percent of the global mean sea level rise rate in 1993, and now constitutes 25 percent of it.  Given scientists' concerns about Antarctica's stability, look for melting glaciers to comprise an even greater share of the sea level rise budget in the near future. Sea level is accelerating! and largest change is coming from increased mass flux of Greenland ice sheet. Now contributes 25% of annual rise. — Chris Harig (@chrisharig) June 26, 2017 The sea level rise rates we expect over next 100 years are several times what the Dutch dealt with in the last 500 years of dike building. — Chris Harig (@chrisharig) June 26, 2017 A different study published in early June found the rate of sea level rise just about tripled between 1990 and 2012.  A study published in 2016 found that if global warming continues above 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through 2100, then sea levels would end up rising faster than at any time during human civilization. That study found that in a warming scenario of 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, which is roughly the path we’re on now, New York City could see more than a meter, or about 3.6 feet, of sea level rise with an even higher upper limit. This would make a Hurricane Sandy-sized storm surge far more common in the city. A separate study published in February found that current rates of sea level rise are likely unprecedented in at least the past 2,800 years. This week's findings are in line with NASA's estimate for the current rate of sea level rise, which is 3.4 millimeters per year.  Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland.Image: Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesThe significance of the new study is that it resolves lingering uncertainties about mismatches between what scientists know about contributors to sea level rise, and measured rates from satellites. This study, along with other recent work, shows the two match up closely, and it nails down the sea level rise acceleration.  Also, the new research shows that coastal communities that are already struggling with increased flooding on an annual basis, such as Miami Beach, will have to cope with a rapidly worsening situation in coming decades.  For every millimeter that the local sea level rises, the easier it becomes for the ocean to hit previously unheard of flood levels. Storm surges ride on top of background sea levels, and like a basketball player playing on a court with a steadily rising floor, even weaker storms are becoming more likely to score a slam dunk.  WATCH: It's official, 2016 was Earth's warmest year on record