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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
The latest news and headlines from Yahoo! News. Get breaking news stories and in-depth coverage with videos and photos.

  • Children among 22 killed in Manchester concert terror attack

    Children among 22 killed in Manchester concert terror attackChildren were among 22 people killed in a suicide bombing at a pop concert in the British city of Manchester, the country's deadliest terror attack in 12 years. Screaming fans, many of them teenagers, fled the venue in panic after the bomb blast, which came at the end of a concert by US star Ariana Grande in the northern English city late on Monday. Police said the attacker was believed to be "carrying an improvised explosive device which he detonated causing this atrocity" and had himself died at the scene, but gave no further details about him.




  • Human rights watchdog condemns Thailand hospital bomb

    Human rights watchdog condemns Thailand hospital bombBANGKOK (AP) — A human rights watchdog condemned the bombing of a Thai hospital that wounded more than 20 people on the third anniversary of a military coup, saying the blast was an inexcusable crime.




  • Deadly blast at Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England

    Deadly blast at Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, EnglandAt least 19 people were killed and more than 50 injured in an explosion at the end of a concert by U.S. singer Ariana Grande in the English city of Manchester on Monday and two U.S. officials said a suicide bomber was suspected.




  • Police: Man slays neo-Nazi roommates over Islam disrespect

    Police: Man slays neo-Nazi roommates over Islam disrespectA Florida man told police he killed his two roommates because they were neo-Nazis who disrespected his recent conversion to Islam, and investigators found bomb-making materials and Nazi propaganda after he led them to the bodies.




  • Newfound ‘alien megastructure’ star leaves scientists baffled

    Newfound ‘alien megastructure’ star leaves scientists baffled

    You're forgiven if the name KIC 8462852 doesn't ring a bell. It's a far-off object, thought to be a star, which was only just discovered in late 2015, but it's already managed to totally confuse researchers in its extremely brief stint on the scientific stage. The star has continually exhibited extremely odd behavior, and has been repeatedly observed experiencing huge dips in brightness that don't seem to have any readily available explanation. Now, the star has been spotted performing the same dimming trick as it has in the past, and scientists are throwing out some extremely wild theories. 

    KIC 8462852, otherwise known as "Tabby's Star" or "Boyajian's Star" depending on where you look, was caught in the act this past weekend, dimming in brightness by about three percent, which is a large enough change to be easily detected. Normally, the dimming of a star at regular intervals would indicate the presence of a planet in orbit, but there doesn't seem to be any pattern to the of dimming exhibited by KIC 8462852.

    Researchers have thrown forth many possible explanations, including other, non-planetary celestial bodies passing in front of the star which are obscuring our line of sight, such as comets, and even the possibility that whatever is floating around the star isn't a naturally-occurring object at all, but instead a massive alien structure. As the research and observations continue, scientists around the globe are hoping that spectral readings will give them a clue as to what, if anything, passed in front of the star. Whatever the object happens to be, it's an exciting time for sky-gazers.




  • Trump administration wants Obamacare subsidy case put on hold, again

    Trump administration wants Obamacare subsidy case put on hold, againBy Lawrence Hurley and Yasmeen Abutaleb WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Trump administration asked on Monday that a major federal court case weighing the fate of the Obamacare cost-sharing subsidies be put on hold again, leaving billions of dollars in payments to insurers up in the air for 2017 and 2018. The subsidies are available to low-income Americans who buy individual health insurance on the exchanges created under the 2010 Affordable Care Act, former President Barack Obama's signature healthcare law, popularly known as Obamacare.




  • Texas bathroom bill could expose secrets of transgender kids

    Texas bathroom bill could expose secrets of transgender kidsAUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Each morning, Joanna Smith's 7-year-old son pulls on a T-shirt and shorts, boasts how fast he can tie his sneakers and heads to school. An honor-roll student who loves science and spelling, he often stays after class to run on the playground with his large group of friends.




  • Sherpas show how the human body can thrive in extreme environments

    Sherpas show how the human body can thrive in extreme environmentsMount Everest is a grueling, deadly place for many adventurers. Beyond the steep terrain, bone-chilling temperatures, and fierce weather, the air is so thin that your body can begin to shut down. That is, unless you're a Sherpa. Members of the Nepalese ethnic group have evolved over generations to withstand the oxygen-deprived atmosphere high in the Himalayas, a new study found.  SEE ALSO: Now you can climb Mount Everest in VR Sherpas are, biologically speaking, extremely efficient at producing the energy they need to reach such heights, even where oxygen is scarce, according to research published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.  Their cells are akin to fuel-efficient cars that can travel farther on less fuel. A porter fetches the ladders to help fix the route for climbers attempting to reach the summit of Mount Everest.Image: Tashi Sherpa/AP/REX/ShutterstockScientists say the findings not only help explain Sherpas' mountain-climbing prowess — they may also lead to new ways of treating oxygen deficiencies, called "hypoxia," in hospital patients. "By understanding how Sherpas are able to survive with low levels of oxygen, we can get clues to help us identify those at greatest risk in [intensive care units] and inform the development of better treatments to help in their recovery," Michael Grocott, a co-author of the study and professor at the University of Southampton in England, said in a press release.  Grocott is the chair of Xtreme Everest, a 10-year-old initiative by doctors, nurses, and scientists to study how our bodies respond to the extreme altitude on Mount Everest. Their ultimate goal is to improve outcomes for critically ill patients. With a 29,029-foot-high peak, Everest is the world's highest mountain. Everest Base Camp is around 17,600 feet, which is plenty high enough to sicken unadjusted visitors. An aerial photograph of Everest Base Camp.Image: Paula Bronstein/Getty ImagesAt those altitudes, where oxygen is scarce, the body is forced to work overtime to make sure the brain and body receive enough oxygen to function. Often, the body will produce more red blood cells, which carry blood to our organs and thicken the blood. As a result, blood flows more slowly and blood vessels are prone to tightening, which can cause dangerous build-up of fluid in the lungs and other risks. Mountain climbers can combat this by bringing oxygen supplies and ascending slowly, giving their bodies time to adjust. Sherpas, however, don't need such a boost.  Previous studies have shown that Sherpas produce fewer red blood cells at higher altitudes. They also produce higher levels of nitric oxide, a chemical that opens blood vessels and keeps blood flowing, which in turn gives them more energy to climb. Sherpas' remarkable physical skills, along with their local expertise, have made them the go-to guides and porters for international expeditions. It's an imperfect arrangement, however. Nepalese guides in recent years have protested poor pay and unsafe working conditions, and in 2014, they went on strike after 16 colleagues were killed in an avalanche. People attend a prayer service in New York City for Sherpa victims of the April 18, 2014, avalanche on Mt. Everest.Image: eric thayer/Getty ImagesFor Monday's study, a research team led by scientists at the University of Cambridge followed 15 Sherpas and 10 "lowlanders" — researchers living in non-high altitude areas — as they gradually ascended to the base camp. The lowlanders took samples, including blood and muscle biopsies, at three different times: in London, for the baseline measurement; upon arrival to base camp; and after two months working at base camp.  They compared those samples to those of the Sherpas, all of whom lived in relatively low-lying areas, and none of whom were "elite" high-altitude climbers. Sherpas' baseline measurements were taken in Kathmandu, Nepal. At baseline, Sherpas' mitochondria — the parts of human cells that respire to generate energy — were already more efficient at using oxygen to produce ATP than those of lowlanders, the samples revealed. ATP, or molecule adenosine triphosphate, is the energy that powers our bodies. A porter walks with a massive load towards Everest Base Camp near Lobuche, Nepal.Image: Tashi Sherpa/AP/REX/ShutterstockSherpas' measurements hardly changed once they reached the base camp, suggesting they were born with such biological traits. Lowlanders, meanwhile, saw their measurements change as their bodies acclimatized and began to mimic the Sherpas'. After two months at camp, Sherpas also produced more phosphocreatine, an energy reserve that acts as a buffer to help muscles contract when no ATP is available. Lowlanders, by contrast, saw their phosphocreatine levels crash.  And, unlike lowlanders, Sherpas did not experience a rapid increase in free radicals, which are molecules created by a lack of oxygen that can potentially damage cells and tissues. "Sherpas have spent thousands of years living at high altitudes, so it should be unsurprising that they have adapted to become more efficient at using oxygen and generating energy," Andrew Murray, the study's senior author and a senior lecturer at the University of Cambridge, said in the press release.  "When those of us from lower-lying countries spend time at high altitude, our bodies adapt to some extent to become more 'Sherpa-like', but we are no match for their efficiency," he said. WATCH: Drone captures breathtaking footage of Norwegian mountains




  • New leak sheds light on Apple’s upcoming 10.5-inch iPad Pro

    New leak sheds light on Apple’s upcoming 10.5-inch iPad Pro

    In 2010, Apple launched the iPad and reinvigorated, what was then, an arguably non-existent tablet market. As sales skyrocketed, even Apple executives were taken aback the iPad's popularity, with the device quickly becoming the fastest-selling product in consumer electronics history.

    A few years later, iPad sales not only began tapering off, but declining substantially. In a relatively short amount of time, the narrative surrounding the iPad shifted from "the iPad is the future of computing" to "how can Apple save the iPad?" As a quick example, Apple last quarter sold 8.92 million iPads, the first time quarterly sales checked in below 9 million units since 2011.

    Undeterred, Tim Cook remains confident that there's a lot of room for the iPad to return to growth. Looking ahead, there are strong rumors that Apple at WWDC this year will unveil a brand new iPad Pro with a 10.5-inch edge-to-edge display packed into a form factor no larger than the current 9.7-inch iPad model.

    Earlier today, new images purporting to be cases for the aforementioned 10.5-inch iPad Pro and a new 12.9-inch iPad Pro surfaced online via Benjamin Geskin. The leaked images show a four-speaker design, a lightning port, and interestingly enough, a vertical camera orientation similar to what we've seen on various iPhone 8 leaks.

    As for other details surrounding the 10.5-inch iPad Pro model, Geskin relays that it won't be completely bezel-less.

    https://twitter.com/VenyaGeskin1/status/866662604160331776

    7mm bezels all around the device will certainly be sleek, but not as sleek as the iPhone 8 with its reported 4mm bezels. Also of note is that Apple's new iPad models will incorporate the same static home button originally introduced on last year's iPhone 7.

    Additionally, Geskin relays that there will be no new iPad Mini this year, corroborating our exclusive report from last week claiming that Apple will be discontinuing the iPad Mini amid disappointing sales. Some have suggested that Apple releasing larger-screened iPhone models in 2014 with the iPhone 6 and 6s made the iPad Mini form factor less compelling.

    Apple's iPad line certainly needs a breath of fresh air and it will be interesting to see if the upcoming 10.5-inch iPad Pro model can help turn around slumping sales.




  • Sea Lion Drags Little Girl Into Water In Terrifying Viral Video

    Sea Lion Drags Little Girl Into Water In Terrifying Viral VideoThe dramatic moment a sea lion dragged a little girl into the water at a wharf in British Columbia was caught on video.




  • Everything points to Apple launching new MacBooks next month

    Everything points to Apple launching new MacBooks next monthApple will unveil the next big thing for its various software operating systems at WWDC 2017, including iOS 11 and the next macOS major update. But the iPhone maker is also tipped to launch a variety of new products at the show, including the Siri speaker, a 10.5-inch iPad Pro, and new MacBooks. A new report says that Apple is indeed expected to launch new laptops this quarter, and there’s reason to be excited. In a new research note to customers, TrendForce said that notebooks are having a little moment, again. Shipments for the first quarter of the year grew by 6.1% compared to last year, totaling around 37.81 million. That’s a 15.6% decline from the Christmas quarter, but still an impressive result for the period. Apple placed fifth in TrendForce's top, with 3.4 million MacBook laptops shipped during the period — that marks a 15.8% decline compared to the December quarter, but a 15.4% increase compared to last year. TrendForce quotes the MacBook Pro with TouchBar as the device that contributed significantly to the overall shipments. Similarly, the researchers believe the 12-inch MacBook will help Apple ship 10% more laptops in the second quarter of this year than last year. That’s because Apple reportedly plans to launch a new version of the 12-inch MacBook that will feature a new processor. The report notes that promotional pricing for some older models might also be in order. A previous report said that Apple will update the MacBook Pro as well, even if it only launched a new model in late 2016. TrendForce makes no mention of other MacBook updates for the quarter.




  • Man dies after contracting botulism from Northern California gas station's nacho cheese

    Man dies after contracting botulism from Northern California gas station's nacho cheeseThe family of a man battling a severe case of botulism after eating food at a Sacramento-area gas station says he has passed away. Martin Galindo was one of five confirmed cases of the rare disease, which officials say appears to have come from nacho cheese sauce.




  • Turkey summons U.S. envoy over Washington street brawl

    Turkey summons U.S. envoy over Washington street brawlTurkey summoned the U.S ambassador on Monday to protest the treatment of Turkish security officials in the United States during a visit by President Tayyip Erdogan last week, the foreign ministry said. A brawl erupted between protesters and Turkish security personnel outside the Turkish ambassador's residence during Erdogan's visit to Washington to meet U.S. President Donald Trump. Turkey blamed the violence on demonstrators linked to the militant Kurdistan Workers Party while Washington's police chief described the incident as a "brutal attack" on peaceful protesters.




  • New Ford CEO Hackett transformed Steelcase, football programme

    New Ford CEO Hackett transformed Steelcase, football programmeBy Paul Lienert and Alana Wise DETROIT (Reuters) - Ford Motor Co's new chief executive officer transformed office furniture maker Steelcase Inc into a global leader, but in Michigan, he may be more revered as the man who turned around a troubled college football programme. Ford Executive Chairman Bill Ford Jr., whose family owns the Detroit Lions football team, pointed to James Hackett's accomplishments as the University of Michigan's interim athletic director in 2015 while a member of the automaker's board. Ford said at a news conference on Monday that Hackett hired Jim Harbaugh as head football coach and "left the department in much better shape than he found it." Hackett, an Ohio native who played football at the university under legendary coach Bo Schembechler, has run Ford Smart Mobility, a new unit established to oversee and coordinate the company's forays in autonomous driving, ride sharing and other ventures, since March 2016.




  • Supreme Court says US state sought to dilute black vote

    Supreme Court says US state sought to dilute black voteThe US Supreme Court on Monday said Republican legislators in the state of North Carolina illegally used race to draw up congressional districts that would dilute the strength of African-American voters. In a 5-3 ruling, the top US court agreed with plaintiffs who said that the redrawn electoral boundaries deliberately targeted minority voters to diminish their political power. "A state may not use race as the predominant factor in drawing district lines unless it has a compelling reason," Justice Elena Kagan wrote in the majority opinion.




  • Rattled UK PM May forced into 'dementia tax' U-turn after poll lead halves

    Rattled UK PM May forced into 'dementia tax' U-turn after poll lead halvesBy Kylie MacLellan and Kate Holton LONDON (Reuters) - British Prime Minister Theresa May was forced to backtrack on one of her most striking election pledges on Monday to force elderly people to pay more for their social care after her party's opinion poll lead halved in just a few days. Six opinion polls published in the past three days have all shown the Conservative Party's lead over the opposition Labour Party narrow by between 2 and 9 percentage points, though all project May will win the election. May said Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and other opponents had tried to scare the elderly by spreading "fake claims" about her plan to transfer more of the cost from taxpayers to recipients who can afford to fund care themselves.




  • Breathtaking photography series showcases beauty of night sky in areas with no light pollution

    Breathtaking photography series showcases beauty of night sky in areas with no light pollutionTwo photographers have made a set of images exploring the magnificent night skies still found in North American and the grave threat of light pollution.




  • 'Alt-right' leader loses gym membership after confrontation

    'Alt-right' leader loses gym membership after confrontationA leading figure in the "alt-right" movement had his gym membership revoked after a Georgetown University professor confronted him during a workout and called him a neo-Nazi.




  • Body positively identified as missing Duke student

    Body positively identified as missing Duke studentAuthorities said they have found the body of a Duke University student who had been missing for nearly a week.




  • Big game hunter crushed to death by falling elephant that was fatally shot

    Big game hunter crushed to death by falling elephant that was fatally shotTheunis Botha, a trophy hunter, died Friday in Zimbabwe.